Monkeypox | Texas Children's Health Plan

Monkeypox

What you need to know about this public health threat for you and your family.

Monkeypox

What is Monkeypox?

Monkeypox is a rare disease caused by infection with the monkeypox virus. Monkeypox virus is part of the same family of viruses as variola virus.

Am I at risk for getting monkeypox?

At this time, the risk of monkeypox in the United States is believed to be low. Monkeypox does not spread easily between people; however, anyone in close contact with a person with monkeypox can get it and should take steps to protect themselves.  People who do not have monkeypox symptoms cannot spread the virus to others.

What are the symptoms of Monkeypox?

Symptoms of Monkeypox Include:
 
  • Fever
  • Headache
  • Muscle aches and backache
  • Swollen lymph nodes
  • Chills
  • Exhaustion
  • Respiratory symptoms (e.g. sore throat, nasal congestion, or cough)
  • A rash that can look like pimples or blisters that appear on the face, inside the mouth, and on other parts of the body, like the hands, feet, chest, genitals, or anus.
    • The rash goes through different stages before healing completely. The illness typically lasts 2-4 weeks.
    • Sometimes, people get a rash first, followed by other symptoms. Others only experience a rash.
Symptoms usually appear one to two weeks after infection.
 
What should I do if I have symptoms?
 
  • See a healthcare provider if you notice a new or unexplained rash or other monkeypox symptoms.
  • Remind the healthcare provider that monkeypox is circulating.
  • Avoid close contact (including intimate physical contact) with others until a healthcare provider examines you.
  • Avoid close contact with pets or other animals until a healthcare provider examines you.
  • If you’re waiting for test results, follow the same precautions.
  • If your test result is positive, stay isolated and observe other prevention practices until your rash has healed, all scabs have fallen off, and a fresh layer of intact skin has formed.
  • Remain isolated if you have a fever or respiratory symptoms, including sore throat, nasal congestion, or cough. Only go out to see a healthcare provider or for an emergency and avoid public transportation.
  • If you need to leave isolation, you should cover the rash and wear a well-fitting mask.
SOURCE: Centers for Disease Control

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